Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County (AHCMC)

Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award

Introduction

The Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award honors both a high school senior who excels in creative writing and Fran Abrams, who worked tirelessly throughout her career to support the arts and humanities in Montgomery County. The Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award will be a competitive award open annually to all Montgomery County high school seniors. The award includes a cash prize of $1,000 and an award reception featuring a reading by both the winner and a notable local writer.

Purpose

This award is given to a high school senior graduating in the class of 2014 who is enrolled in a public or non-public high school in Montgomery County to benefit his/her pursuit of a creative writing related career. The third annual $1,000 Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award for 2014 will be granted following a juried selection process that is based upon the merit of the original work submitted and the applicant’s potential for a creative writing related career, not financial need.

Eligibility

An applicant must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Be a Montgomery County resident,
  • Be enrolled full-time during the fall semester of their senior year in a public or non-public high school located in Montgomery County, and
  • Have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0.

Applications Deadline

Applications for the 2014 Award are due through the online application system by Thursday, September 18th, 2014 at 11:59pm. Below are the 2014 guidelines and application materials for your reference:

2014 Abrams Guidelines
2014 Abrams Application

Application Preparation Assistance

AHCMC staff will provide assistance to those applying for the Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award. Applicants are encouraged to contact AHCMC with any questions they may have. Assistance is available via email, phone or in-person by contacting Robert Hanson at robert.hanson@creativemoco.com or 301-565-3805.


2014 Recipient: Yiyi "Jessica" Li

Yiyi “Jessica” Li immigrated to America from China at the age of nine and will graduate from Richard Montgomery High School in June of 2014. Her works have been featured on Teen-Ink, Stage-of-life, and the New York Times Education Blog. She has also been recognized in nation-wide contests including the River of Words International Poetry Contest, National Creative Communications Essay Contest, and the Scholastic Writing Awards, as well as in local competitions such as the Bethesda Magazine Essay Contest, MCCPTA Reflections Contest, and One World Education Reflections Program. Jessica will attend Princeton University in the fall of 2014 and hopes to become a news reporter/commentator.

 

Artistic Statement 
Illegal immigrant. Teenage mother. Housewife of a Wall Street billionaire. Do you think crime? Burden? Extravagance and perpetual festivity? After coming to America, my family moved from a grease-smelling garage-sized tenement sheltering fourteen people to a house of our own on a scenic street. The stereotypes I had been associated with in the eyes of my counterparts had changed, yet, there was always a monochromatic label that they slapped onto me. That’s what got me to pick up my pen. I write to amplify the non-mainstream voices, for I’ve witnessed the power of words to peacefully erase prejudices and open our eyes to what we once refused to see.

2013 Recipient: Sydney Axelrod

Congratulations to Sydney Axelrod, recipient of the 2013 Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award! Sydney is graduating senior at Richard Montgomery High School. Next year, she plans to attend Drexel University, where she will be majoring in Communications with a minor in either English or Screenwriting. Join us for a reading of her work on June 11th!

  


Artistic Statement

"A 'wise' woman once told me that my generation has no imagination. Now, I use the term 'wise' loosely, seeing as that is an incredibly ignorant attack on the entire future of our society. Nevertheless, her words hit home and slapped me in the face. No imagination?! Well, I decided at that point -- being the stubborn thirteen year old that I was -- that I would prove her wrong. In the years that have passed, I have come to realize that my generation has developed into the carbon-copy clones we all know not as a result of our own laziness, but of the system by which we are educated. Now, I'm not blaming the nation's teachers; I'm looking at the man behind the curtain who's putting the scores before the skills. Students are taught the form that will get them a 'five' instead of their own satisfaction and I have a problem with this. It's true that you need to know the rules before you can break them, but there's nothing wrong with testing the waters now and then in your writing. My writing is distinct, because I'm not afraid to add a sarcastic edge, reference pop culture, or even quote some colloquial curse words if it means that I'm getting my point across. I know my limits, but push my boundaries."

Featured Author: Tim Denevi

Denevi's first book, Freak Kingdom: A Personal History of Hyperactivity, will be published in 2014 by Simon and Schuster. He received his MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Iowa. Recently he received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. HIs fiction and nonfiction has appeared in various magazines, including Arts & Letters, Hobart, and Wag's Revue. He also teaches nonfiction at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

 

 

2012 Recipient: Ruthie Prillaman

Ruthie Prillaman, recipient of the 2012 Fran Abrams Creative Writing Award is graduate of Richard Montgomery High School. Ruthie continued her studies last fall at Yale, where she is majoring in English with concentration in Creative Writing.

 


Featured Author: Susan Coll

The award reception featured a reading by local author, Susan Coll. Susan Coll is the author of the novels Beach Week, Acceptance, Rockville Pike, and karlmarx.com. She has worked as a travel and feature writer, and has also written a few op-eds and book reviews, publish