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Adrienne Clancy, PhD, MFA

Primary Discipline: Dance

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Phone: (301) 717-9271

E-Mail: info@clancyworks.org

Web Site: http://ClancyWorks.org

Biography

Adrienne Clancy, PhD, MFA is the Founding Director of ClancyWorks, a dance company that shifts perceptions through quality performances to advance positive social action. Prior to ClancyWorks, Adrienne worked with choreographers: Bella Lewitzky, Liz Lerman, Nora Reynolds-Daniel, Bill Evans, Maida Withers, Doug Hamby, and Victoria Marks. Clancy’s work has been presented nationally and internationally in Australia, Colombia, England, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Paraguay and Poland. Dr. Clancy earned a PhD and MFA in Dance from Texas Woman’s University, MA in Dance (emphasis in History & Criticism) from the University of New Mexico, and BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. Clancy wrote for Oxford University's International Encyclopedia of Dance and penned the foreword for "Reminiscences of a Dancing Man" by Bill Evans, published by the National Dance Association. Clancy has been on the faculty of Goucher College, American University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Towson University and currently at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Clancy’s work has received many awards, recently including the 2014 County Executive’s Award for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities Education Award, and the 2014 Individual Artist Award for Choreography from the MD State Arts Council and from the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County.

Residency 1: Earth and Space Dance

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $150 per session; $250-$500 for planning and evaluation

Residency 1 Description

In this residency, students will learn concepts and vocabulary from Earth and Space Science as well as modern dance. The class will physicalize concepts from science and ultimately create an Earth and Space Dance.

At the end of the residency, students will perform a final dance showcasing what they have learned. This "Earth and Space Dance" will include sections of each student's artistic voice, improvisation, partner work, and group movements incorporating science concepts such as gravity, Big Bang Theory and Earth's rotation and revolution.

Duration

5 days, 5 sessions per class,60 minutes per session, 30 students maximum per class. The lessons will include guided practice as well as individual exploration to allow the instructor to have individual contact with each student. This program also lends itself to longer residencies.

Academic Focus:

Fine Arts,Science/Technology,Physical Education

Assessment

Assessment options may include: Student dance journal related to exploration of Earth and Space Science through movement, Question/response. Final "Earth and Space Dance" performance criteria: artistic voice, improvisation, partner work, and group movements incorporating science concepts such as gravity, Big Bang Theory and Earth's rotation and revolution. In addition, spatial directions, elements of dance, as well as astronomy concepts will be checked for understanding.

Other Needs

The Earth and Space Dance residency requires an open space large enough for 30 students to move easily. A gym floor or all purpose room is ideal. No technical requirements necessary.

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0: Perceiving and Responding
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production

Non-Arts Standards

Science Standard 2.0: Earth and Space Science



Residency 2: US History and Jazz Dance

Grade: 9th - 12th
Fee for Service: $150 per session; $250-$500 for planning and evaluation
Cultural Origin: African-American

Residency 2 Description

In this residency, students will be introduced to the genre of Jazz Dance including the history for this style of dance, basic technique, and vocabulary. Students will link U.S. history events with the evolution of Jazz Dance from the Reconstruction Era to present day. During the residency, students will also learn about one of the most famous jazz choreographers, Bob Fosse, and his first musical that he choreographed called "The Pajama Game." The class will explore the historical context of this musical including strikes, unions, and the Progressive Era.

Duration

5 days, 5 sessions per class, 1 hour per session, 30 students maximum. The lessons will include guided practice as well as individual exploration to allow the instructor to have individual contact with each student. This program also lends itself to longer residencies.

Academic Focus:

Fine Arts,Social Studies/History,Physical Education

Assessment

Assessment options may include: Dance journal reflecting the connection between Jazz Dance and US History, Daily culminating activity, Questions/student responses, Final dance.

Other Needs

Open space large enough for 30 students to move easily. A gym floor is ideal. Technical requirements needed - TV/VCR and PowerPoint capability if possible.

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing and Responding: Aesthetic Education, Standard 2.0 Historical and Cultural Context, Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production

Non-Arts Standards

Social Studies Standard 5.0 United States History

Residency 3: Dancing Stories

Grade: K - 2nd,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $150 per session; $250-$500 for planning and evaluation
Cultural Origin: African, African-American, Asian, European, European-American

Residency 3 Description

In this residency, students will learn the elements of narrative texts and how these facilitate meaning. The class will be introduced to the elements of dance. Each student will use these literary and dance elements to create a story through movement. At the end of the residency, students will perform this final dance showcasing what they have learned.

Duration

5 days, 5 sessions per class, 1 hour sessions, 30 students maximum. The lessons will include guided practice as well as individual exploration to allow the instructor to have individual contact with each student. This program also lends itself to longer residencies

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Physical Education

Assessment

Assessment options may include: Reading fluency/comprehension criteria for reading narrative texts, identification of elements such as the main problem, sequence or chronology of events, and the solution to the problem in addition to the setting, mood, and characters in the story, dance journal-personal story with literary elements, movement piece incorporating dance elements

Other Needs

An open space large enough for 30 students to move easily; a gym floor or all purpose room is ideal. No technical requirements necessary.

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, and Responding: Aesthetic Education, Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts Standard 3.0 Comprehension of Literary Text

Residency 4: ASPIRE

Grade: K - 2nd,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $150 per session; $250-$500 for planning and evaluation of entire residency; $0.50/mi for travel

Residency 4 Description

The ASPIRE Residency demonstrate that creative movement can be used to:
Acquire knowledge
Solve conflicts
Partner to accomplish greater goals
Improve academic achievement through arts integration
Respect self and others
Embrace diversity
In this residency students will learn concepts and vocabulary from health as well as dance. The class
will cover concepts from the Maryland State Curriculum including a decision making process, positive
character traits, and communication skills through dance partnering and the elements of dance. The
class will foster structured and supportive interactions with classmates, give practice in problem
solving, and build academic as well as artistic skills. For example, in solving choreographic
challenges, students will collaborate and practice leadership. At the end of the residency, students
will perform a final dance showcasing what they have learned.

Duration

5 days, 5 sessions per class,60 minutes per session, 30 students maximum per class. The lessons
will include guided practice as well as partner work and individual exploration to allow the instructor to
have individual contact with each student. This program also lends itself to longer residencies.

Academic Focus:

Health

Assessment

- Student journals documenting discovery and knowledge in health and dance;
- Before, interim, and after surveys completed by school staff and students;
- Class attendance;
- Academic performance in covered subjects measured by student grades;
- Teaching artist observation of students and completion of checklists/grading rubrics for
movement exercises, collaboration skills, peer interactions, discussion, and journal writing;
- Student self assessment through video documentation;
- Peer assessment facilitated by Teaching Artist;
- Observations by classroom teachers/administrators;
- Markers of success for participants will include improvement in school attendance,
advancement to the next grade, improved behavior, application of the same discipline, creativity, and
memorization skills required in dance to that of other academic endeavors;
- Fun Facts - after each class students will be given a sheet to list and reflect upon the new
ideas and facts that they learned in the workshop

Other Needs

The ASPIRE residency requires an open space large enough for 30 students to move easily. A gym
floor or all purpose room is ideal. No technical requirements necessary as the Teaching Artist will
supply music/speakers as well supplies and handouts.

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0: Perceiving and Responding
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production

Non-Arts Standards

Health Standard 1.0 Mental and Emotional Health
Topic A: Communication
Topic D: Decision Making
Topic E: Character Traits
Depending on curricular focus selected by teacher(s), the ASPIRE residency may also connect with
standards in English/Reading Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and/or Math.

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Sue Trainor

Primary Discipline: Music

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Phone: (410) 381-2834

E-Mail: SueTrainor@aol.com

Web Site: http://SueTrainor.com

Biography

Sue Trainor is a performing songwriter, award-winning recording artist, member of the nationally touring vocal trio Hot Soup, and a master teaching artist. Her participant-centered, experiential ""Writing Songs To Learn"" residency and assembly programs explore the commonalities between language arts and music, motivating children and adults to apply familiar language-based skills in new, musical ways.

Sue's energy and humor keep everyone's attention as she utilizes the power of lyrics, melody and rhythm to inspire songs about curriculum topics - from retelling ""Little Red Riding Hood"" to explaining the math concept ""turn, flip and slide;"" from outlining discoveries about electricity to interpreting events in colonial America.

Sue offers professional development programs designed for educators, librarians, and artists who want to learn more about arts integration in education and literacy.

Sue is represented by Young Audiences of Maryland: www.yamd.org, 410-837-7577.

Residency : Writing Songs To Learn

Grade: 3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $2500 includes an opening assembly, a closing program, and seven workshops in each of four classes

Residency 1 Description

This residency focuses on the musical elements of language. Composing tools - beat, rhythm, melody and lyrics - will be modeled and applied to create one original song in each classroom. The song content will focus on a curriculum-related topic selected by the teacher. At grade level, the artist will facilitate student composition, encouraging students to tell their story in detail. Good composition structure (strong opening lines, beginnings, middles and ends, focus, sequencing, use of active language) is stressed. Melody is created based on spoken intonation and rhythmic choices are based on meaningful emphasis.

Residencies begin with an introductory assembly and conclude with a performance of the songs written.

Duration

5 (minimum) to 7 days, 5 (minimum) to 7 sessions per class, 45 (minimum) to 60 minutes per session, 25 students maximum per class

Academic Focus:

Mathematics,Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts

Assessment

Assessment options may include:
Formative assessment: large and small group discussion, individual writing, pair and share, all respond, lists and charts.
Summative assessment: (seven sessions or more only) Checklist-students will make individual aesthetic judgments about the class composition and offer suggestions for rhythmic, melodic and lyric revision based on class-established criteria drawn from prior knowledge, classroom teacher's guidance, and from residency artist's instruction.

Other Needs

Clear stage space with electrical access for performances, standard classroom arrangements for workshops. School provides chart paper, markers, tapes or CDs for recording songs.

Fine Arts Standards

Music Standard 3: Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4: Aesthetic Criticism

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts Standard 1.0 General Reading Processes
Standard 4: Writing
Standard 6: Listening

MSCs in Math, Science, Social Studies or Reading may also be addressed, depending on the teacher's choices for song topics.

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Mary Gresock

Primary Discipline: Music

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Phone: (301) 879-2069

E-Mail: newportgresock@aol.com

Biography

Mary Gresock, Artistic Director of Odyssey Opera Theatre, holds a BA in music education and a MA in voice/opera performance from the University of Maryland Opera Studio. She currently serves as an Educational Artist with the Washington National Opera (WNO), the Wolf Trap Institute in Vienna, Virginia, and the Lyric Opera of Baltimore. Mary recently completed a long association with Baltimore Opera as a principle singer and stage director for their acclaimed outreach program series. Mary is a recent graduate of the Teaching Artist Institute, a program established by the MD Arts Council, Arts Education in Maryland Schools, and Young Audiences of Maryland.

Mary has also served as stage director/choreographer of children's operas for Baltimore Opera's Touring Opera Series, the "Opera Kids" of The Levine School of Music in D.C., and The Washington National Opera's Summer Opera Camp. As an educational artist with Washington National Opera for several years now, Mary continues to work with students in creating and producing their own original operas, which culminate in a showcase at the WNO studios.

Residency : Opera Tales

Grade: K - 2nd,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: Kick off Assembly - $450.00 (single); $750.00 (b/b) Planning - $75.00 Orientation Meeting - $75.00

Residency 1 Description

Following an assembly program by Odyssey Opera Theatre, students will work together to develop their own mini-opera version of a familiar story. Through the creative process of combining music, drama, movement, and visual arts to create the opera, students will deepen their understanding of story structure, sequencing, character analysis, creative writing and vocabulary. Life skills such as listening, cooperation, and teamwork will also be emphasized as students discover how exciting it can be to share a story through the elements of opera.
The story can be chosen from opera repertoire such as Hansel and Gretel, or it can be a story currently being covered within the class curriculum. Among the stories which have been explored and transformed through this residency program are: Maia: A Dinosaur Grows Up, The Emperor's New Clothes,Three Little Pigs, Strega Nona, American Tall Tales, and Bremen Town Musicians.

Duration

4 days minimum (Residency length varies according to curriculum needs)
4 sessions minimum
Longer residencies which involve at least 8 sessions can culminate in a student performance/sharing experience.
45 minutes per session (minimum)
15 to 25 students per session

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Social Studies/History

Assessment

Methodology of assessment may include:
1) Observation in the form of: anecdotal, rubric, informal checks such as specific bodysigns (eg. thumbs up/down), checklists, self evaluation

2) Other evidence in the form of: homework, journals, written reflections which include both answers to questions and the students' opportunity to ask questions at the end of each session

3) Culminating presentation

4) Questions and answers exchanged between the performing students/creators and audience

5) Follow up session of reflection and aesthetic comments and critique of the presentation

Other Needs

Space: Residency may take place in the classroom if there is a space similar to that of a "circle time" area (as in Kindergarten). A more effective space would be the stage area of a cafeteria. A piano or key board may be needed for accompaniment.

Fine Arts Standards

Music:
Standard 1.0: Perceiving, Performing and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3.0: Creative Expression and production
Standard 4.0: Aesthetics and Criticism
Theatre:
Standard 1.0:Perceiving and Performance:Aesthetic Education:
Standard 3.0: Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4.0:Aesthetics and Criticism

Non-Arts Standards

Standard 3.0: Comprehension of Literary Text
Standard 4.0: Writing
Standard 5.0: Controlling Language
Standard 7.0: Speaking
Social Studies:
Standard 2.0: Peoples of the Nation and World

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Jon W. Spelman

Primary Discipline: Theater/Storytelling

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Phone: (240) 355-6360

E-Mail: jspelman@erols.com

Web Site: http://jonspelman.org

Biography

Jon Spelman has been active in Arts in Education for much of his adult life. He currently works with the Kennedy Center For The Arts in the Partners in Education Program, Professional Development Opportunities For Teachers Program, and Arts Coaches Program (Changing Education Through The Arts). Jon is also on the roster of Young Audiences of Maryland/Arts For Learning. He offers a variety of specially tailored workshops and residency programs and is frequently scheduled as a performing storyteller, both locally and nationally. He especially welcomes the opportunity to develop special programs in partnership with individual schools and teachers.

Jon received his BA Degree in American History and Literature, with Honors, from Williams College. He was awarded the Master of Arts Degree in Theatre by Purdue University.

Jon's work has been supported by grants from The National Endowment for the Arts, The Maryland Arts Council, The Arts Councils of Florida and The District of Columbia, and the National Storytelling Network.

Jon has received a Children's Radio Award, an Achievement in Children's Television Award, and two Emmys, presented by the Washington Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, for "Three Stories Tall."

Residency : Listen-see-tell-write

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $350.00 per day, mileage additional
Cultural Origin: American Indian/Alaska Native

Residency 1 Description

Through this residency, students will be able to effectively tell a simple personal story or folktale. Students will understand the differences between listening and hearing and will appreciate the value and fun of effective directed listening. Students will tell a simple personal story or folktale to students in at least one other class.

Students will be able to give and receive useful peer and teacher evaluation and criticism. Students will value and will learn to take pleasure in the creative and controlled use of their own unique imaginations. Students will be able to identify many of their strengths and to correct their weaknesses as communicators, listeners and readers.

Duration

3 to 6 days, 3 to 6 class sessions, 45 to 60 minutes per session, 20 to 25 students.
A residency is best designed as a collaborative project with a classroom teacher, and is directed at one teacher and one class.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Social Studies/History

Materials Required

None

Assessment

Assessment includes: rubric, story craft/story structure, "3P"/ "2E"
The three 'P' are Person/people, Places(s), Problem(s) or conflicts. The two "E" are Effort(s) to solve the problem and End.

Ask Yourself: 1) What are the "3P" / "2E" in my story? and 2) How can each of the five elements of "3P / 2E" be used to expand or clarify my story, and to make it more believable and vivid (make more pictures in the listener's imagination)?

Other Needs

A room that is large, comfortable, and quiet. Writing materials for the students.

Fine Arts Standards

Music:
Standard 1: Perceiving, Performing and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3.0: Creative Expression and production
Standard 4.0: Aesthetics and Criticism
Theatre:
Standard 1: Perceiving and Performance: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3: Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism

Non-Arts Standards

Standard 3.0: Comprehension of Literary Text.
Standard 4.0: Writing:
Standard 5.0: Controlling Language Standard 7.0: Speaking
Social Studies
Standard 2.0: Peoples of the Nation and World

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Arianna Ross

Primary Discipline: Theater/Storytelling

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Phone: (301) 518-8607

E-Mail: administrator@ariannaross.com

Web Site: http://storytapestries.com

Biography

Arianna Ross creates entertaining, international and dynamic programs that weave the power of dance, theatre, music and storytelling together. Arianna entertains and educates children and adults through performances, hands-on workshops and long term residencies. For over 12 years, she has performed in the US, India, Vietnam, Brazil and Canada on stage, television, and radio, in colleges, concert halls, and hospitals. Arianna has taught for critically acclaimed organizations such as the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Smithsonian, and Towson University. Recently, Arianna was one of the featured performers at the 2008 Minnesota Fringe Festival, The Faberge Egg Festival in Washington DC, The Just Stories Festival in Chicago and at the Vancouver, BC International Storytelling Festival. As a storyteller, dancer, visual artist, teacher and health-care consultant, Arianna strives to tell multi-lingual stories that can both bridge the gap between communities and remind us: "It is through the laughter and tears of our tales that the lessons of life are imparted."

Residency 1: Stories in Motion= Writers

Grade: K - 2nd,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $300: Orientation/Planning/Evaluation Meetings $200: Supplies (This # depends on the residency.) $10
Cultural Origin: African

Residency 1 Description

This residency helps students discover new ways to tell stories, dance, create music, be dramatic, learn techniques to give a speech, write a story or even perform in a play or dance concert. Through the residency, not only will the students deepen their understanding of the core curriculum and increase their writing and communication skills, they will cultivate their peer relations and develop a stronger sense of self-confidence. At the start, they will turn off the words and discover how sounds and movement can tell a story. Then, students will turn the words back on and realize how much more powerful a story can become with the combination of music, dance and spoken word. Students will perform a "Story in Motion" as the final event.

Duration

5 - 15 days
5 - 15 sessions with the students
45 minutes per session
15 minute break in between sessions when there are sequential sessions
Max: 5 classes per day
2 planning meetings: meet with the entire team. The teachers usually share classroom rules, environment and dynamics. Additionally, as the artist, I usually observe the students in action prior to the second planning meeting. 1 evaluation meeting to reflect and evaluate our process together.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts

Assessment

Assessment options may include: The specific methodology of assessment will depend on the grade level and the teacher's needs.
Teacher observation, Questions/Responses (individual/whole group)
They will be evaluated on:
1) Student work: Dances/performances (individually and as a team)
2) Students' ability to verbalize concepts.
3) Improvement in writing/creating/expressing complete story ideas
4) Expansion of vocabulary
*Whole group questioning- The Artist will provide questions in a creative format. The Artist will also make recommendations to the teachers based on her observations of the students and their growth following each session. Upon completion, the students will have the stories they created to keep and share. The level of writing and ability to perform will reflect the ownership of knowledge.

Other Needs

Space Requirements: Open space free of chairs and tables (The classroom can be rearranged to accommodate both the size of the space and the teacher's needs.)

Materials needed: Easel Paper, Markers, Masking Tape

Fine Arts Standards

Theatre:
Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production
Dance:
Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production:
Music:
Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Specific Standards will depend on the grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts
Standard 6.0 Listening
Standard 7.0 Speaking
Standard 5.0 Controlling Language
Standard 4.0: Writing
Mathematics
Standard 1.0 Knowledge of Algebra, Patterns, and Functions

Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Residency 2: Explaining Science with Story

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $300: Orientation/Planning/Evaluation Meetings $200: Supplies (This # depends on the residency.) $10

Residency 2 Description

All residencies can be adapted to fit the curricula needs of the schools. Please read below for a template of what is possible during this specific residency to integrate language arts, mathematics, theatre, music, and dance skills into one cohesive experience. In ancient times, people explained a scientific phenomenon with a story. Through creative drama, storytelling, and writing, the students will discover the how's and why's of science. They can explore either a specific scientific process such as "What is the water cycle?" or answer an overarching question such as "Why is the weather changing?" Furthermore, not only will the students deepen their understanding of the core curriculum and increase their writing and communication skills, they will cultivate their peer relations and develop a stronger sense of self-confidence. At the end, students will share what they learned/created in an informal performance.

Duration

5 - 15 days
5 - 15 sessions with the students
45 minutes per session
15 minute break in between sessions when there are sequential sessions
Max: 5 classes per day
2 planning meetings: meet with the entire team. The teachers usually share classroom rules, environment and dynamics. Additionally, as the artist, I usually observe the students in action prior to the second planning meeting. 1 evaluation meeting to reflect and evaluate our process together.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Science/Technology

Assessment

Assessment options may include: The specific methodology of assessment will depend on the grade and the class. Rubrics, Teacher observation, Questions/Responses (individual/whole group*) They will be evaluated on:
1) Student work: Creative Drama/ Writing/ Performances (individual/team)
2) Students' ability to verbalize concepts.
3) Improvement in writing/creating/expressing complete ideas
4) Expansion of vocabulary
*Whole group questioning- introduced by the Artist and expanded upon by the classroom teacher. The Artist will provide questions in creative format. The Artist will provide a rubric to assess the students writing and dramatic performances. The team will also make recommendations to change based on their observations of the students and their growth following each session. The level of language and ability to perform will reflect the ownership of knowledge.

Other Needs

Space Needed: A normal classroom can be adapted to fit any space requirements needed

Materials needed: Easel Paper, Lined Paper, Pencils, Pens, Colored Pencils, Crayons, Yarn, Masking Tape

Fine Arts Standards

Theatre:
Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism

Specific standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts:
Standard 6.0 Listening
Standard 7.0 Speaking
Standard 5.0 Controlling Language
Writing Standard 4.0
Science Standard 1.0 Skills and Processes
Standard 2.0 Earth/Space Science

Residency 3: Silly Story Writing

Grade: K - 2nd
Fee for Service: $300: Orientation/Planning/Evaluation Meetings $200: Supplies (This # depends on the residency.) $10

Residency 3 Description

Wonderfully Ridiculous Letter Stories: Using Creative Writing & Storytelling to Motivate & Improve Literacy
Silly letter stories are a perfect genre for encouraging students' language development. Students will recognize and hear the different phonetic sounds and the dolche sight words while discovering how to write a story. Depending on the literacy level of the students, teachers will decide what they need to explore. Together, we will write and dramatize a story using a word containing the target sound in every sentence. The result: A comic adventure ready to be shared with another class about perhaps a Green Giant named Gita who grabs big bagels. Students will deepen their understanding of the core curriculum and increase their writing and communication skills as well as cultivate their peer relations and develop a stronger sense of self-confidence. At the end, the students will perform their own creative stories.

Duration

5 - 15 days
5 - 15 sessions with the students
45 minutes per session
15 minute break in between sessions when there are sequential sessions
Max: 5 classes per day
2 planning meetings: meet with the entire team. The teachers usually share classroom rules, environment and dynamics. Additionally, as the artist, I usually observe the students in action prior to the second planning meeting. 1 evaluation meeting to reflect and evaluate our process together.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts

Assessment

Assessment options may include: The specific methodology of assessment will depend on the grade and the class. Rubrics, Teacher observation, Questions/Responses (individual/whole group*)
They will be evaluated on:
1) Student work: Creative Drama/ Writing/ Informances (individual/team)
2) Students' ability to verbalize concepts.
3) Improvement in writing/creating/expressing complete ideas
4) Expansion of vocabulary
*Whole group questioning- introduced by the Artist and expanded upon by the classroom teacher. The Artist will provide questions in a creative format. The Artist will provide a rubric to assess the students writing and dramatic performances. The team will also make recommendations to change based on their observations of the students and their growth following each session. The level of language and ability to perform will reflect the ownership of knowledge.

Other Needs

Space Needed: A normal classroom can be adapted to fit any space requirements needed

Materials needed: Easel Paper, Lined Paper, Pencils, Pens, Colored Pencils, Crayons, Yarn, Masking Tape

Fine Arts Standards

Theatre
Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism

Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/Language Arts
Standard 1.0 General Reading Process
Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text
Standard 4.0 Writing:
Standard 5.0 Controlling Language
Standard 6.0 Listening
Standard 7.0 Speaking
Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Residency 4: The Power of the Written Word

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $300: Orientation/Planning/Evaluation Meetings, $200: Supplies (this # depends on the residency)

Residency 4 Description

Discovering the Power of the Written Word: Using Creative Writing and Storytelling to Motivate Students to become Authors:
All residencies can be adapted to fit the curricula needs of the schools. From the beginning of time writing has had the ability to empower, anger, hurt, encourage, or excite someone. Students will redefine and polish their written voice. Through a series of creative writing exercises students discover the power of their own words to tell a story, change someone's opinion or create an imaginary place.
Not only will the students deepen their understanding of the core curriculum and increase their communication skills, they will cultivate peer relations and develop a stronger self-confidence. Finally: A special writers' event where the students have the opportunity to share the stories they wrote with their peers and community members.

Duration

5 - 15 days
5 - 15 sessions with the students
45 minutes per session
15 minute break in between sessions when there are sequential sessions
Max: 5 classes per day
2 planning meetings: meet with the entire team. The teachers usually share classroom rules, environment and dynamics. Additionally, as the artist, I usually observe the students in action prior to the second planning meeting. 1 evaluation meeting to reflect and evaluate our process together.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts

Assessment

Assessment options may include: The specific methodology of assessment will depend on the grade and the class. Rubrics, Teacher observation, Questions/Responses (individual/whole group*)
They will be evaluated on:
1) Student work: Creative Drama/ Writing/ Informances (individual/team)
2) Students' ability to verbalize concepts.
3) Improvement in writing/creating/expressing complete ideas
4) Expansion of vocabulary
*Whole group questioning- introduced by the Artist and expanded upon by the classroom teacher. The Artist will provide questions in a creative format. The Artist will provide a rubric to assess the students writing and dramatic performances. The team will also make recommendations to change based on their observations of the students and their growth following each session. The level of language and ability to perform will reflect the ownership of knowledge.

Other Needs

Space Needed: A normal classroom can be adapted to fit any space requirements needed

Materials needed: Easel Paper, Lined Paper, Pencils, Pens, Colored Pencils, Crayons, Yarn, Masking Tape

Fine Arts Standards

Theatre
Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production
Theatre Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism
Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts Standard 2.0: Comprehension of Informational Text
Standard 3.0: Comprehension of Literary Text
Standard 4.0: Writing Standard 6.0 Listening
Standard 7.0 Speaking
Standard 5.0 Controlling Language

Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Residency 5: His-Story/Her-Story/Our-Story

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $300: Orientation/Planning/Evaluation Meetings $200: Supplies (This # depends on the residency.) $10

Residency 5 Description

His-Story, Her-Story, Our-Story: Using Storytelling, Creative Drama, and Writing to Dramatize Perspectives in Social Studies:
Storytelling, Drama, and Creative Writing provide the perfect bridge between the rote learning of historical facts and a deeper comprehension and empathy for events and people. In this residency, classes are divided into small groups or "families" that personify the diverse perspectives that exist during a significant historical conflict. Students develop a narrated group story based on their exploration of the differing points of view through creative drama, storytelling and creative writing. Not only will the students deepen their understanding of the core curriculum and increase their writing and communication skills, they will cultivate their peer relations and develop a stronger sense of self-confidence. By the end of the residency, as a culminating event, students will perform a selection of their historical fiction for their peers in another classroom.

Duration

5 - 15 days
5 - 15 sessions with the students
45 minutes per session
15 minute break in between sessions when there are sequential sessions
Max: 5 classes per day
2 planning meetings: meet with the entire team. The teachers usually share classroom rules, environment and dynamics. Additionally, as the artist, I usually observe the students in action prior to the second planning meeting. 1 evaluation meeting to reflect and evaluate our process together.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Social Studies/History

Assessment

Assessment options may include: The specific methodology of assessment will depend on the grade and the class. Rubrics, Teacher observation, Questions/Responses (individual/whole group*)
They will be evaluated on:
1) Student work: Creative Drama/ Writing/ Informances (individual/team)
2) Students' ability to verbalize concepts.
3) Improvement in writing/creating/expressing complete ideas
4) Expansion of vocabulary
*Whole group questioning- introduced by the Artist and expanded upon by the classroom teacher. The Artist will provide questions in a creative format. The Artist will provide a rubric to assess the students writing and dramatic performances. The team will also make recommendations to change based on their observations of the students and their growth following each session. The level of language and ability to perform will reflect the ownership of knowledge.

Other Needs

Space Needed: A normal classroom can be adapted to fit any space requirements needed

Materials needed: Easel Paper, Lined Paper, Pencils, Pens, Colored Pencils, Crayons, Yarn, Masking Tape

Fine Arts Standards

Theatre
Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production
Theatre Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism

Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts Standard 6.0 Listening
Standard 7.0 Speaking
Standard 2.0: Comprehension of Informational Text
Standard 4.0: Writing S
Social Studies Standard 5.0 History

Specific Standards will depend on the selected grade level and teacher's individual needs.

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Gail N. Herman

Primary Discipline: Theater/Storytelling

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Phone: 301-501-0044

E-Mail: gnherman@comcast.net

Web Site: http://gailherman.net

Biography

Creative storyteller and arts consultant, Dr. Gail N. Herman, has performed and taught storytelling extensively throughout Maryland and the United States, as well as internationally. Besides performing for students in schools and libraries, Gail works with teachers and counselors to infuse storytelling into reading, science, social studies and math by using the kinesthetic, musical, and spatial aspects of learning. She teaches for Lesley University, Garrett College and The University of Connecticut. Gail has directed the Tall Tale Liar's Festival in MD for 18 years and has conducted hundreds of in-service storytelling workshops. She is also a guest lecturer in art appreciation classes at George Mason University and Maryland Institute, College of Art and at the University of Connecticut. She performed at the Albert Schweitzer Symposium at the United Nations in NYC, at the Chautauqua Institute in Chautauqua, NY, the WV Storytelling Institute at Fairmont State, and the Northeast Storytelling Festival in Historic Gettysburg. Gail has received many grants from PA, CT, WV, and MD State Arts Council Artist in Education (AIE). She continues her work on Coal Talk Oral Histories. Recently she received a grant from MBEC to collect and perform stories in the Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania.

Residency : Creatures of the Chesapeake

Grade: K - 2nd,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: Performance at beginning of residency $400, $360 per day for 4 classes

Residency 1 Description

Storytelling is one of our first languages. Students will engage in the important theatrical skills of expressive communication and review content from their language arts and the science curriculum about the effects of pollution on animals. Gail will demonstrate the art of storytelling and the use of a story map to help retelling. Second, after reviewing problems of the Chesapeake, students will create a circle story using the map strategy and their knowledge of ecosystems and animals from the Bay area. The habitat could be a farm, ocean, or forest according to grade level. Gail will lead activities for students to explore voices, sound effects, and movements for the retelling.
While creating their story Gail models and encourages alliteration, puns, figurative language, and encourages fact finding about the animals the group has chosen for their story.

Duration

4-5 days
50-55 minutes per class period each day

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Science/Technology,Social Studies/History

Materials Required

A large table for my musical instruments and props with 4 feet of space between me and the class I am teaching. Room to move into small groups of 4 to 5 students. Copy services for maps, handouts, etc. Books on Chesapeake.

Assessment

Questions

Fine Arts Standards

Theater Standard 1 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education
Standard 2 Historical, Cultural and Social Context
Standard 2 Creative Expression and Production
Standard 4 Aesthetics and Criticism

Non-Arts Standards

Science and Language Arts: Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective.
The students will be able to:
1. Explain ways that individuals and groups of organisms interact with each other and their environment
2. Obj. a & b. Identify and describe the interactions of organisms present in a habitat. Explain that changes in an organism's habitat are sometimes beneficial to it and sometimes harmful.

From the Local Montgomery Grade 4 Reading/Language Arts Summary
Plans and delivers effective oral presentations and uses criteria for peer review.
Determines a speaker's point of view by tone of voice and body language

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Suzanne Fierston

Primary Discipline: Visual Arts

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Biography

Suzanne Fierston received her training in art from the Art League School at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Virginia. She also received a Masters degree in English from Northwestern University. She has been teaching as an artist-in-residence to Montgomery County public schools since 2005, focusing on third through eighth grades. She also teaches non-fiction writing as an instructor in the Masters in Writing program at the Johns Hopkins University.

As an artist, she paints both in acrylics and watercolor and has had solo shows at the National Museum of Health and Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, among others. In September 2007, she began her latest series, 100 Flowers, inspired by an exhibit of Japanese scroll paintings at the Sackler Gallery. These paintings have been shown at the Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University Hospital, the NIH, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Suzanne writes a weekly column for the Sierra Club on nature and art at
http://connect.sierraclub.org/post/OnTrack/
Click on Art.

Suzanne is a member of the Art League of Alexandria, Virginia, the Rockville Art League, and the Gaithersburg Fine Arts Association.

Residency 1: Nature Journaling

Grade: 3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $200 or as discussed

Residency 1 Description

Students create an illustrated nature journal that includes original drawings, recording of data (such as bloom dates of flowering trees), scientific observations of the local watershed, and original poetry. This interdisciplinary residency brings together elements of science, math, language arts with the fine arts as students investigate seasonal cycles or phenology. As part of this study, students will learn elements of printmaking, watercolor painting and contour drawing by going outside the classroom and drawing, painting and printing from nature.

Duration

This residency can run between 8 and 24 school days, meeting monthly, or more frequently, during the cycle of the school year.

In one school day, she can meet with up to three groups of students for 90 minutes each. Because we will go outside, weather permitting, the classroom teacher must be present during my time with the students.

Class size maximum: 30 students.

Academic Focus:

Mathematics,Fine Arts,Science/Technology

Materials Required

Materials include sketchbooks, watercolor crayons,and printing ink. She can work with teachers to find supplies with a 1 month notice.

Assessment

Science: 2.0 Students will use scientific skills to explore chemical and physical interactions of the earth and universe that occur over time. 6.0 Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective.

Math: 4.0 Students will collect, organize, display, analyze, or interpret data to make decisions or predictions.

Language arts: 2.0 Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate informational text. 4.0 Students will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.

Other Needs

At the conclusion of this graded project, students exhibit the illustrated nature journal and art projects they have completed during the school year. At this show, depending on the requirements of the classroom teacher(s) students may also exhibit other work, such as charts, graphs, research reports, or poetry on a trifold board. In this case, a specific rubric will be developed with the classroom teacher, but it will include the following elements: 1. Thoughtful completion of fine art projects that reflect journal observations; 2. Evidence of scientific observations (temperature data, wind speed, circumference of trees) in the field journal; 3. Adherence to language art writing guidelines and formats (haiku, cinquain, sonnet, research report, descriptive fiction); 4.Evidence of data organization (graphs, charts)and analysis; and 5.Respectful use of art materials.

Fine Arts Standards

Fine Arts:
1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education:
Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art.
3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.

Non-Arts Standards

Science: 2.0 Students will use scientific skills to explore chemical and physical interactions of the earth and universe that occur over time. 6.0 Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective.

Math: 4.0 Students will collect, organize, display, analyze, or interpret data to make decisions or predictions.

Language arts: 2.0 Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate informational text. 4.0 Students will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.

Residency 2: My Vision of Utopia

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: $200 daily fee or as discussed

Residency 2 Description

My vision of Utopia. My Vision of Utopia is a symbolic representation of a student's utopia, done in acrylic paint on a 16 x 20 inch canvas. This interdisciplinary residency combines study of utopias, both literary and historical, from Language Arts and World Studies, with elements of the fine arts. Students keep a sketchbook during the residency and use it to practice their learning in color, line and composition as taught by the artist. At the end of the residency, students exhibit this sketchbook as well as their completed painting, at a student art show.
Sixth graders exhibit their paintings and give oral presentations on the symbolism in their work to visitors. They also write a 5 paragraph essay on the symbolic meaning of their painting. Students will understand the diversity and commonality, human interdependence, and global cooperation of the people of Maryland, the United States, and the World through a multicultural and a historic perspective.

Duration

This residency runs for approximately 10 88 minute periods, not including an optional one-day field trip to the National Gallery of Art. The days do not have to be consecutive. She can teach up to two 88 minutes periods per day; She can also teach this class in 44 minute periods. Maximum class size: 35

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Fine Arts,Social Studies/History

Materials Required

Materials fee:$5-7 per student. Materials include sketchbooks, watercolor crayons, & acrylic paint. She can work with teachers to find supplies with a 1 month notice.

Assessment

The artist and teacher develop a rubric that contains the following elements:
1.Evidence of symbolic use of color, line and shape in the final painting;
2.Ability to explain these symbols in a 3 minute oral presentation and in a 5 paragraph paper (including the ability to explain what an ideal society is and is not, based on laguage arts and world studies readings);
3.Knowledge and ongoing study of color, line and shape as shown by entries in the student's sketchbook (at least 2 for each artist-led class); 4.Seriousness of purpose in completing the final painting, including preparation of a draft; 5.Use of at least 3 different painting techniques in the final painting; and
6.Use of art materials respectfully, including careful set-up and clean-up.

Other Needs

I have found that students take arts integration seriously if their classroom teacher participates too. Because of this, I ask that teachers plan to be in the classroom during the workshop.

Fine Arts Standards

Visual art: Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context: Students will demonstrate an understanding of visual art as an essential aspect of history and human experience. Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.

Non-Arts Standards

Language arts: Standard 3.0 Comprehension of Literary Text: Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate literary text. Standard 4.0 Writing: Students will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.

Social studies: Standard 2.0 Peoples of the Nation and World

Residency 3: Gyotaku-fish prints

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: Daily fee $200 or as discussed
Cultural Origin: Asian

Residency 3 Description

Come print with actual fish as students study the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay using the Japanese technique of gyotaku. Over 3 45-minute periods, students will practice this technique on 12 x 18 inch rice paper and on white t-shirts. They will also carve a Japanese kanji stamp to represent their signature and they will use the stamp to sign their final print and shirt. This residency concludes with a classroom art exhibit of matted fish prints.

This residency works well with 4th to 8th grade students. For younger students, I suggest choosing between the rice paper and t-shirt because of the complexity of the project. I can supply rubber models of fish if a teacher prefers.

Duration

This residency takes 3 45 minute periods over three days. Maximum class size: 25

Academic Focus:

Fine Arts,Science/Technology

Materials Required

Materials fee:$ 2-5 per student. Materials include fish, rice paper, and printing ink.I can work with teachers to find
supplies, with a one-month notice.

Assessment

The science teacher and artist will develop a rubric evaluating students using the following criteria:
1) Ability to name the major parts of a fish
2) Ability to define the Japanese word gyotaku and explain how the Japanese developed this art form
3) Evidence of careful work in the printing process, including lack of smudges and rips or wrinkles in paper
4) An understanding of the role of the rockfish in the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay
5) Serious of purpose in using art materials and in classroom behavior during the residency.

Other Needs

A sink, or access to one, is essential. Wall space to hang daily projects for class review, and floor space to lay out wet projects is helpful.

I have found that students take arts integration seriously if their classroom teacher participates too. Because of this, I ask that teachers plan to be in the classroom during the workshop.

Fine Arts Standards

Visual art: Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context: Students will demonstrate an understanding of visual art as an essential aspect of history and human experience. Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art. Standard 4.0 Aesthetics and Criticism: Students will demonstrate the ability to make aesthetic judgments.

Non-Arts Standards

Science: Standard 3.0 Life Science The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. 6.0 Environmental Science
Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective.

Residency 4: Identity Project

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: $200 or as discussed

Residency 4 Description

In the Identity Project, students research their family history and present their results in the form of a five to six slide PowerPoint presentation. Students will learn the elements of effective design and clear writing by combining up to 5 paragraphs of text with images and animation effects.

Duration

This residency runs for three 84 minute blocks (or six 45 minute periods). The days do not have to be consecutive. It is possible to schedule a fourth block to allow students to present their work in a classroom show.

This class takes place in the school computer lab. We will need three days in the lab for each section of students.

Maximum number of students per section: 30

Materials Required

There is no materials fee for this residency because it is held in the school computer lab.

Assessment

The rubric will include the following graded elements:
1. Evidence that students have completed pre-writing activities (draft, graphic organizer) before writing the three to five paragraph essay;
2. Evidence of research into the origins of their family name (family stories, web site research);
3. A presentation that begins with a title slide, listing their name, section, and essay title;
4. Four to five additional slides showing a basic understanding of graphic design, including consistent background, color and font choice;
5. Slide images that match the text; and
6. Respectful behavior toward other students in the computer lab, including making wise choices about seating, staying on task, and in using the computers.

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education: Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art. Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art."

Non-Arts Standards

English: Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate informational text.

Standard 4.0 Writing

Students will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.

Residency 5: Mesoamerica Pottery

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: $200 daily or as discussed
Cultural Origin: American Indian/Alaska Native

Residency 5 Description

Students will explore Olmec, Maya, and Aztec cultures through historical analysis, writing, and the fine arts. With the artist, they will create two clay artifacts based on their research into hieroglyphics and cultural symbols using air-drying clay and tempera paint. Students will keep a process journal which will be exhibited with the artifacts at an art show in May.

Duration

This residency takes place over 12 days in 1 45 minute period per day. I can teach up to 4 45 minute periods per day. Maximum class size: 30 students.

Academic Focus:

Fine Arts,Social Studies/History

Materials Required

Materials fee: $2-5 per student. Materials include air drying clay and acrylic paint. I can work with teachers to find supplies with a one-month notice.

Assessment

The artist and world studies teacher will look for:
1) Evidence that a student has transferred their knowledge of the research to the design of their pots
2) Evidence of accurate research for each society.
3) Legend should explain the individual design of each pot.
4) Evidence that the student has participated in the daily instruction (reflection journal is complete).
5) Thoughtful design of pots (as explained in legend, draft, and reflection journal)
6) Respectfulness toward other students and in using art materials.

Other Needs

A sink, or access to one, is essential. Storage space to lay out daily projects for class review is helpful.

I have found that students take arts integration seriously if their classroom teacher participates too. Because of this, I ask that teachers plan to be in the classroom during the workshop

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 1.0 Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education: Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art. Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context: Students will demonstrate an understanding of visual art as an essential aspect of history and human experience.
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.

Non-Arts Standards

Social studies: 2.0 Peoples of the Nation and World
Students will understand the diversity and commonality, human interdependence, and global cooperation of the people of Maryland, the United States, and the World through a multicultural and a historic perspective.
3.0 Geography
Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time. Standard
4.0 Economics
Students will develop economic reasoning to understand the historical development and current status of economic principles, institutions, and processes needed to be effective citizens, consumers, and workers participating in local communities, the nation, and the world.
English: 4.0 Writing. Students will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.

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Carien Quiroga

Primary Discipline: Visual Arts

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Phone: 301-233-4735

E-Mail: carienquiroga@yahoo.com

Web Site: http://carienquiroga.com

Biography

Carien Quiroga was born in South Africa and in 2002 relocated to the USA. She holds degrees in criminal justice, psychology and fine arts. She has since consistently worked as both a multi-media artist and art educator. She creates public artwork and exhibits her work in group and solo shows while teaching workshops and doing artist residencies. Carien has extensive experience working with all age groups and skill and developmental levels. She is currently Lead Artist for Arts on the Block, a job-training initiative for creative youth using the arts as a medium to teach art principles and techniques as well as life and workplace skills. Carien also teaches a variety of workshops in Traditional and Alternative Drawing and Sculpture Techniques, Mosaic and Fused Glass Techniques at Weisser Glass Studio in Kensington.Carien is on the Class Acts Arts, Artist roster and has participated in Artist-in-Residence programs at the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, the Choice program at UMBC and Montgomery County Correctional Facility, where she works both with young offenders and in the Crisis Intervention Unit.

Residency 1: Among The Stars

Grade: 3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: Total cost is $ 4300 Includes artist fees/traveling, all materials for creation of a 60 sq. ft. mura

Residency 1 Description

Symbols and symbolism are elements of visual language and with the imaginative minds and creative hands of students it will grow into a beautiful image telling an inspiring story. The residency objective is to enhance and re-enforce the Science (Astronomy) and Language Arts (Creative Writing) curriculum while integrating the art of metal embossing, glass mosaic and the use of symbolism in Visual Art to create a mixed media mosaic mural. Students will study, identify and recognize the scientific relevance of constellations, how they are formed and the differences and similarities between them. Using the constellations as inspiration, students will create a personal symbolic constellation using line and pattern as design elements. Through a creative writing process students will reflect on the meaning of their individual constellation. Each student will be represented in the larger mural by the individual embossed metal and glass mosaic element they created, thus leaving behind a visual legacy.

Duration

6-day residency spread over a two week period

Academic Focus:

Mathematics,Reading/English Language Arts,Science/Technology,Health,Physical Education

Assessment

All students will complete a pre- and post test to evaluate their knowledge.
Pre-Survey
1. What is a constellation?
2. How can symbolism be used to effectively communicate artists' ideas?
3. What is a legacy?
4. What is a mosiac?
5. What is metal embossing?

Post-survey
Includes the questions above an addition to the questiuons below
1. What are some of the skills you improved during the Arts Integration Residency?
2. Write 3 or more sentences about the project and your feelings about having the opportunity to participate in it
3. What did you like the most about the Arts Integration Residency?
4. What did you like the least about the Arts Integration Residency?

Students also writes a poem that is graded by the classroom teacher

Other Needs

Day 1: LCD Projector or Prometheum board
Day 3: LCD Projector or Prometheum board
Day 4-6: area to work that accomodates the whole mural (5'x12'), this should be a place that the mural can be safely worked on and left out during non-school hours

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 1.0
Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education: Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive, interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art.
Standard 3.0
Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.
Standard 4.0
Aesthetics and Criticism: Students will demonstrate the ability to make aesthetic judgments.

Non-Arts Standards

Science
Standard 2: Earth / Space Science Astronomy

Language arts:
Standard 4.0 Writing

Residency 2: Cuando era joven

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: The total cost of the residency is $ 4300. This includes artist fees/traveling and all materials for
Cultural Origin: Hispanic/Latino

Residency 2 Description

Through an investigation into the life and art of Mexican Artist Frida Kahlo, students will develop an
understanding of how she used her art not only as self-expression but to document the various rich
and colorful aspects of Mexican culture as it related to her personally. Students will learn how she
used symbolism to visually represent the numerous personal tragedies that she experienced
throughout her life. During the residency, students will have the opportunity to develop a personal
visual language through the use of symbolism. The TA will guide them to understand that art can be
used as a tool not only for self-expression, but also as a way to record major life events, history and
aspects of a culture. Each student will create a small individual metal embossed disk and a fused
glass mosaic that will be integrated into a larger final mural, allowing students to work as a team and
develop an understanding of a collaborative art making process.

Duration

This is a 6-day residency spread over a two week period.
Day 1 - 3: (session length of 45 min) Artist meets with individual classes of up to 25 students per
class.
(Total: 80)
Day 4-6: (Full school day) Artist meets with students on a rotation basis in groups of no more than 15
at a time. The session length average 30 min at a time to allow all students to have a chance to work
with the artist each day. The schedule of the last 3 days is determined by the amount of students in
the grade.

Academic Focus:

English Language Proficiency,World Languages

Assessment

Following the residency students will write a biographical essay on the life and art of Frida Kahlo, with
particular reference to the cultural, historical and personal factors that influenced her. During regular
class time and under the direction of the Spanish classroom teacher each student edited and rewritten
to prepare a final narrative. The writing sample will be evaluated and included in the student's
Spanish portfolio.
A pre- and post survey that includes the following questions with be administered.
1. Who is Frida Kahlo?
2. How can symbolism be used to effectively communicate anartists' ideas?
3. What is "mosaic"? What is "metal embossing"?
4. What are some of the skills you improved during the Arts Integration Residency?
7. Write 3 or more sentences about the project and your reflections about having the opportunity to
participate in it.

Other Needs

LCD Projector or Prometheum board, access to water and a area to in work that acoomodates the
whole mural (5'x12'), this should be a place that the mural can be saftely worked on and left out
during non-school hours

Fine Arts Standards

National Standard 1: The learner will develop skills necessary for understanding and applying media,
techniques, and processes.
NS 2: The learner will organize the components of a work into a cohesive whole through knowledge
of organizational principles of design and art elements.
NS 3: The learner will choose and evaluate a range of subject matter and ideas to communicate
intended meaning in artworks.
NS 4: The learner will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.
NS 5: The learner will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others

Non-Arts Standards

Foreign language: (Spanish 2A/2B)
Language Arts:
Voluntary State Curriculum: Standard 4.0 Writing

Residency 3: Earth Voices

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: The total cost of the residency is $ 4300. This includes artist fees and all materials for the creat
Cultural Origin: African

Residency 3 Description

As concerns for the environment mounts so should our energy and dedication grow in creating
awareness regarding protecting and restoring our natural resources and ecosystems. Middle school
students will create a metal, glass and ceramic mosaic artwork that will be permanently installed in
the school, paying tribute to our beautiful planet while giving voice to their concerns for the
environment. students will develop an understanding of the interconnectedness, interdependence and
diversity of all life and recognize that environmental changes can have local, regional, and global
consequences. The residency integrates the art of metal embossing, glass and ceramic mosaic with
science, symbolism and the writing process. The 60 SF mural will depict themes of bio-diversity,
lifecycles, and environmental issues. The use of recycled glass will reinforce the role artists can ply in
environmental conservation

Duration

This is a 6-day residency spread over a two week period.
Day 1 - 3: (session length of 45 min) Artist meets with individual classes of up to 25 students per
class. (Total: 80)
Day 4-6: (Full school day) Artist meets with students on a rotation basis in groups of no more than 15
at a time. The session length average 30 min at a time to allow all students to have a chance to work
with the artist each day. The schedule of the last 3 days is determined by the amount of students in
the grade.

Academic Focus:

Science/Technology

Assessment

A pre- and posttest will be administered and students will be asked to write a reflection on the
residency including observations on the mural making process and the impact environmentally
conscious artist can have. Students will reflect on the interconnectedness of all life on the planet

Other Needs

LCD Projector or Prometheum board, access to water and a area to in work that accommodates the
whole mural (5'x12'), this should be a place that the mural can be safely worked on and left out
during non-school hours

Fine Arts Standards

National Standard 1: The learner will develop skills necessary for understanding and applying media,
techniques, and processes.
National Standard 2: The learner will organize the components of a work into a cohesive whole
through knowledge of organizational principles of design and art elements.
National Standard 3: The learner will choose and evaluate a range of subject matter and ideas to
communicate intended meaning in artworks.
National Standard 5: The learner will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their
work and the work of others.

Non-Arts Standards

Science
Indicator 1.0: Skills and Processes - Students will demonstrate the thinking and acting inherent in the
practice of science.
Indicator 3.0: Life Science - The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the
dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over
time.
Indicator 6.0: Environmental Science �¯ Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the
interactions of environmental factors (living and nonliving) and analyze their impact from a local to a
global perspective.
Language arts:
Voluntary State Curriculum: Standard 4.0 Writing

Residency 4: �Personal symbols in Metal and Glass� - Mixed Media Mosaic Residency

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: The total cost of the residency is $ 4300. This includes artist fees/traveling and all materials for

Residency 4 Description

In this 6-day residency students will create a permanent metal and glass mosaic mural measuring a total of 60 square feet. The residency integrates the art of metal embossing and glass mosaic to introduce and reinforce concepts from the State mandated curriculum in Social Studies and Language Arts. Students will be introduced to Southern African Rock Art and the art Ndebele ceremonial beadwork and mural painting. While developing an understanding of the complex symbolism of African image-making each student will create a small individual metal embossed and glass mosaic artwork developing a personal visual language through the use of symbolism. Individual artworks will be integrated into a larger final artwork.

Duration

This is a 6-day residency spread over a two week period.
Day 1 - 3: (session length of 45 min) Artist meets with individual classes of up to 25 students per class.
Day 4-6: (Full school day) Artist meets with students on a rotation basis in groups of no more than 15 at a time. The session length average 30 min at a time to allow all students to have a chance to work with the artist each day. The schedule of the last 3 days is determined by the amount of students in the grade.

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Social Studies/History

Assessment

All students will complete a pre- and post test to evaluate their knowledge.
Pre-Survey
1. Who are the Ndebele People? Who are the Khoi San People?
2. How do different cultures use symbolism to tell stories or communicate?
3. How do different cultures use symbolism in adornment on their homes and person?
4. What is "mosaic"?
5. What is metal embossing?

Post-survey
Includes the questions above an addition to the questions below
1. What are some of the skills you improved during the Arts Integration Residency?
2. Write 3 or more sentences about the project and your feelings about having the opportunity
to participate in it.
3. What did you like the most about the Arts Integration Residency?
4. What did you like the least about the Arts Integration Residency?
5. Students also write a poem that is graded by the classroom teacher

Other Needs

Day 1 and 3: LCD Projector or Prometheum board
Day 4-6: area to work that accommodates the whole mural (5'x12'), this should be a place that the mural can be safely worked on and left out during non school hours. Access to running water

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 1.0
Perceiving and Responding: Aesthetic Education: Students will demonstrate the ability to perceive,
interpret, and respond to ideas, experiences, and the environment through visual art.
Standard 3.0
Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize knowledge and
ideas for expression in the production of art.
Standard 4.0
Aesthetics and Criticism: Students will demonstrate the ability to make aesthetic judgments.

Non-Arts Standards

Social studies:
Content Standard 3.0: World History
Content Standard 4.0: Geography
Content Standard 7.0: Peoples of the Nations of the World
Language Arts:
Content Standard 4.0: Language

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Annetta Dexter Sawyer

Primary Discipline: Dance

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Phone: 301-412-5071

E-Mail: raas@rcn.com

Web Site: http://annettadextersawyer.com

Biography

Annetta Dexter Sawyer teaches dance as a way of kinetic learning that integrates reading and writing skills. She combines expressive movement with innovative ways to teach basic concepts.

Her training began as a youth in Verona, Italy with the Kirov Ballet where she performed for their summer opera residencies at the Arena di Verona. Growing up overseas she was exposed to a tremendous amount of art and culture. As a student of the American Schools she was a member of the National Honor Society, enjoyed sports, and also performed in school productions. She came to America to attend Rutgers College graduating with Teacher Certification for Secondary English, a B.A. in English, & a minor in Communications.

Sawyer holds a Master's Degree in Performing Arts from American University. She is an adjunct professor of Fine Arts at Trinity College and is on faculty at Montgomery College teaching Interdisciplinary Studies/Integrated Arts for educators. Ms. Dexter Sawyer is also certified from the Teaching Artist Training Institute, MD and works for area arts organizations. Selected by AHCMC as a teaching artist for 2009 and 2010 ELO/SAIL Arts in Education programs and works for the Arlington Public Schools Humanities Project.

Residency 1: Let's MOVE to the BIG PICTURE!

Grade: K - 2nd
Fee for Service: $100 per session $.55 mileage $ 25 video materials, photo documentation

Residency 1 Description

Create 'choreopoems' that incorporate vocabulary, phonemic awareness, and reading fluency. The
BEST elements of dance (body, energy, space, time) work to reflect the "physical process" of learning
to read and write. Word chunks (initial, medial, and ending) become gesture, sounding out single and
combined letters are made physical to stimulate comprehension, a 'choreopoem' is built with sight
words.
Just as reading and writing follow sequential patterns so does dance. Children learn floor or spatial
patterns as well as rhythmic ones. Comprehension soars to new heights because words made into
movement act as sensory stimuli that feed mental imagery, the basis of reading comprehension.
With my skill-building 4, 3, 2, 1 Movement Game simple addition and subtraction patterns are danced.
Number sentences are transformed into movement sentences, counting or skip counting are matched
in movement patterns. Forward or backwards counting patterns become the 4, 3, 2, 1 Movement
Game.

Duration

Duration: 45 minute session
Residency Duration: Once weekly for one month
Number of students: 20

Academic Focus:

Mathematics,Reading/English Language Arts

Assessment

"Choreopoem" recitation of three poems The Crocus, Walter Crane; Happy Thoughts, R.L.
Stevenson; The Pancake, Christine Rossetti.
Each student is responsible for creating a 'sound to movement to word' progression as an individual
presentation.
Assessment: How is reading process reflected in kinesthetic awareness and vice-versa? In which
does the child excell? This can give us information on how to best address their learning style and
needs.
Criteria: Can they engage in repetition, sequence, contrast (Dance Standard 3.0)? Can they follow
narrative and theme/variation (Dance Standard 3.0)? Can they process word chunks, recite and recall
word rhyme (Reading Standard 1.0)? Do they articulate, enunciate, and speak loudly enough to be
heard while dancing? (Reading Standard 7.0)?
Math criteria: Ability to solve simple addition/subtraction problems. Identify patterns. (Math Standard
1.0)

Other Needs

Electrical outlet (for music ipod)
Smart boards or over head projector (for projected word chunks/sounds/phonemes, etc.)

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, & Responding: Aesthetic Education
Dance elements used to communicate by "sounding out" with choreography.
Dance Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, & Social Context
Explain how dance relates to individual expression.
Demonstrate ways in which knowledge and skills of other content area are related to dance. Show a
variety of themes, movement sequences that build on this relationship.
Dance Standard 3.0 Creative Expression & Production
Exhibit spatial awareness, concentration, projection, and physical discipline.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English Language Arts Standard 1.0 General Reading Process
Segment words into syllables. Delete or add sounds to form new words.
Reading/English Language Arts Standard 7.0 Speaking
Use verbal/non-verbal techniques like volume and/or gesture. Speak clearly enough to be heard and
understood. Participate in dramatic presentations.
Create movements and describe how they can express mood or feeling.
Identify and express ways ideas may be expressed in dance and other content areas.
Math Standard 1.0 Knowlegde of Algebra, Patterns, & Functions
Represent and analyze growing patterns kinesthetically such as: clap/snap, clap/snap/snap, clap/
snap/snap/snap.
Identify patterns in real-world situations.

Residency 2: Rhyme & Rap:We Do It Like That

Grade: 3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: $100 per session $.55 mileage $25 video materials, documentation

Residency 2 Description

This residency highlights learning the "toolbox of poetry" in combination with recitation, creative
movement, and learning about the cultures that make up America! By reviewing word choice, sensory
details, alliteration, repetition, and onomatopoeia the poem by Yvonne Seon 'Totem Games' comes to
life. Each line is matched with gestures and dance moves that evoke the imagery of the poem. This
process teaches fluency, sequential understanding, alongwith creative expression. As this poem also
focuses on various cultures, students benefit by learning about Native American traditions and world
cultures that have animism as a basis for dance or story-telling. Cultural influences from around the
world are examined as a variety of poems are featured. When learning from the text just isn't enough
~ Rhyme & Rap makes for a great learning experience! It provides students with critical thinking skills
and expression of their point of view in an arts integration fashion.

Duration

Duration: 45 minute session
Residency Duration: Once weekly for one month
Number of students: 20

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts,Social Studies/History

Assessment

After analysis of 'Totem Games' or other culturally specific poems students write a Brief Constructed
Response on their heritage and what America means to them. They learn about the many various
cultures that make up America. This combines Reading/ELA Standard 3.0 with Social Studies
Standards 2.0 & 6.0.
The arts curriculum is assessed by group reading in combination with dance. Each student is
assigned rhyming sections to movement. Each poetic line or syllable breakdown as cadence must
match the movement phrase. All these are support and a "warm up" to help them write their Brief
Constructed Response on heritage and America.

Other Needs

Electrical outlet (for music ipod)
Overhead Projector or SmartBoard (for "toolbox of poetry" demonstration, writing, etc.)

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, & Responding: Aesthetic Education demonstrated
through movement sequences (imagery), dance elements (locomotor vs non-locomotor), and
interpretation of literal ideas.
Dance Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, & Social Context
Explain reason people in various cultures dance. Explain how dance relates to individual expression.
Demonstrate a variety of ideas and themes common to dance and other art forms.

Non-Arts Standards

Social Studies Standard 2.0 Peoples of the Nation & the World
Elements of culture and diffusion are explored by comparing Native American, African, and European
perspectives.
Social Studies Standard 6.0 Skills & Processes
Make connnections with the text using prior knowledge and experience. Identify and explain what is
directly stated in the text. Identify, paraphrase, and summarize in movement and verbally the main
idea of the text.
Reading & ELA Standard 3.0 Listen to critically, read, and discuss literary text representing diverse
cultures, perspectives, ethnicities, and time periods. Identify and describe setting and mood.

Residency 3: Poetry In Motion

Grade: 6th - 8th
Fee for Service: $100 per session $.55 mileage $25 video materials, documentation

Residency 3 Description

Transform your Poetry Curriculum into physical expression! Together with the Reading/English
Language Arts teacher we will select poems to put into Poetry In Motion. Students find a personal
way to bring meaning to the classics and modern literature. The poet's "toolbox" is interpreted in
dance! Classical literature or contemporary poems can be examined via personification, hyperbole,
and onomatopoeia. Great workshop to support word structure and patterns for fluency. Effective
support in the acquisition of new vocabulary through literary discussion as it relates to "movement
ideas". Communication of personal interpretations matches poetic imagery. A powerful program that
impacts comprehension! Poems I suggest:
Manners, Elizabeth Bishop
This is Just to Say, William Carlos Williams
Me, Walter de la Mare
Words, Nancy Byrd Turner
Kubla Khan, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
Caged Bird, Maya Angelou

Duration

Duration: 45 minute session
Residency Duration: Once weekly for one month
Number of students: 20

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts

Assessment

Rubric based on ability to select and combine
1. Poetic elements with dance elements
2. Aesthetic principles discussed in class (alliteration, repetition, word choice, sensory details, "action
words", mood, tone)
3. Choreographic forms (i.e. manipulation of form and content) and how "movement ideas" are
structured
4. When given a poem how well do they read, how well can they interpret it as dance? (Dance
Standards 1.0, 3.0 and Reading/ELA Standards 1.0, 3.0)
Poetry In Motion assessments also include: read to determine meaning; understand new words; and
the synthesis of reading with movement to promote conversational, fluency through use of pace,
intonation, and expression. This is demonstrated through how well students perform their poem. Can
they distinguish character, setting, mood and connections between point of view and meaning?
(Reading ELA Standard 3.0) Can they perform figurative language with dance elements and make
connections between personal and universal themes?

Other Needs

Electrical outlet for music ipod
Smart Board or blackboard

Fine Arts Standards

Dance Standard 1.0 Perceiving, Performing, & Responding Interpret meaning of a variety of dance
studies. Compare how elements of dance are used to communicate meaning.
Dance Standard 3.0 Creative Expression & Production
Literal and non-literal ideas taught using improvisation. Aesthetic principles modify movement ideas.
Choreographic forms used to communicate a poem. Demonstrate performance competenticies using
spatial awareness, physical discipline, concentration, and projection.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/ELA Standards 1.0 General Reading Processes
For fluency apply knowledge of word structures and patterns to read with ease. Demonstrate
appropriate use of phrasing by understanding sentence patterns and structures that signal meaning in
the text. Use pacing and intonation to convey meaning.
Reading/ELA Standard 3.0 Comprehension of Literary Text
Analyze text features that contribute to meaning. Use structural features to determine types of poetry
such as ballad, narrative, lyric. Analzye sound elements that contribute to meaning.

Residency 4: Dance: Spoken Word Movement

Grade: 9th - 12th
Fee for Service: $100 per session $.55 mileage $25 video documentation, photography

Residency 4 Description

Teenagers need to be understood. This residency offers a way to develop a structure or a forum in
which their voices may be heard. It allows for a time and place for their ideas to take shape through
language arts and performance. Dance movement based in time, space, and energy functions to give
a greater dimension to the student's written words. They may use stream of consciousness writing or
poetic forms as material for an informal performance where words, rhythms, movement, and gesture
are combined. Required: journal writing. Appropriate for dancer and "non-dancer"!
This residency's goal is to provide learning experiences that integrate writing and dance. It gives
teens creative tools to make them more effective communicators while also giving them an
exhilarating expressive arts experience. Students will be able to express themselves in spoken word
and movement; use their own experiences as material; have a performance art format for topical
issues.

Duration

Duration: 45 minute session
Residency Duration: Once weekly for one month
Number of students: 20

Academic Focus:

Reading/English Language Arts

Assessment

Reading ELA for high school students is determined by how well they engage interpersonally by
talking about and writing their script and how well they perform.
Reading ELA Rubric:
Have they put analytical skills to work?
Does their writing (and oral presentation) reflect critical thinking on their chosen topic?
Dance Outcomes for Creative Expression & Production are tested by Dance Rubric:
What is their idea?
How is it presented?
Is it clearly spoken?
Do dance movements enhance spoken word or written text?
Performance Evaluation:
Dance Outcomes I & III (are perceptual skills performed? do changes in perception affect dance?
does student organize dance ideas and improvise? can they apply skills from the language of dance
to compose improvisationally?
Reading ELA (is writing focused on issue of concern? does journaling reflect comprehension and
interpretation of text? is there critical analysis conducive to both their writing, thought process, and
dance composition?

Other Needs

Electrical outlet (for music ipod)
Theater classroom preferable
Powerpoint capacity (preferred, not necessary)
Students must have a notebook for journaling

Fine Arts Standards

Essential Learner Outcomes for the Fine Arts (ELOs)Dance Outcome I Perceive, Perform, & Respond
~ Aesthetic Education: The student will demonstrate the ability to use perceptual skills through
performing and responding in dance. Expectation A: The student will investigate and identify ways
that changes in perception affect dance experience. Students identify, analyze, and apply various
criteria in dance aesthetics in order to develop critical and creative thinking skills.
Dance Outcome III Creative Expression & Production ~ The student will demonstrate the ability to
create dance by improvising, organizing dance ideas, and performing. Expectation A: The student will
apply skills and knowledge from the language of dance to improvisation.

Non-Arts Standards

Reading/English/Language Arts Curriculum from 2007 VSC:
Provide a clear focus on work-related reading and writing and other critical areas of team work, oral
presentations, and peer response.
Content expectations: Comprehension and Interpretation of text; Analysis and evaluation of text,
composing, controlling language, speaking, and listening.

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Suzanne Herbert-Forton

Primary Discipline: Visual Arts

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Phone: 410-747-1706

E-Mail: suzanne@herbert-forton.com

Web Site: http://herbert-forton.com

Biography

Suzanne has been a working artist in Baltimore for over 25 years. Her experience includes working in the studios of fiber and metals artists. Her interests in both ceramics and fiber arts led her to the creation of a body of work in mixed media.

Suzanne has taught in venues ranging from recreation to the full time classroom. She has participated in the Maryland State Arts Council Artist in Education program as a residency artist since 2002. Suzanne works with teachers to design a residency specific to their needs. In her residencies students create works in embroidery or ceramic relief sculpture; or a combination of both. The end product might be an installations for their school or an individual work.
Suzanne has been active in arts integration work. She presented the visual arts component at the Maryland Artist /Teacher Institute in 2007. In 2008 she completed the Teaching Artist Institute cosponsored by Young Audiences, AEMS and the Maryland State Arts Council.

Residency 1: Peoples' Story in Fiber & Clay

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: The fee for this residency is $60. per session/hour. The school pays for materials. Materials costs

Residency 1 Description

This residency will integrate social studies and visual art objectives.
The artist will work with teachers to design a residency focused on a particular cultural or national
group of people that students will be studying.
(For example, students I recently worked with were studying the Yaocomaco Native Americans, who
lived in what is now southern Maryland.)
Students will create an embroidered and ceramic installation depicting the life and culture of a group
that they are studying. Students will research the group in books, via the internet, and possibly in field
trips.
The artist will guide each student in designing and making an embroidery and a relief sculpture frame
for the embroidery that depict some aspect of the life/history of this group.
Connections may be made to the ceramics or fiber arts produced by the group under study.
When the frames are fired, and the embroideries complete they will be assembled into a
mural for installation in the school.

Duration

Suggested length of this residency 15-20 days. Times will vary according to the number of
participants. For 100 students approximately 42 sessions. An additional 18 hours should be allotted
for materials preparation, firing ceramics, and assembling the installation.

Academic Focus:

Social Studies/History

Assessment

Assessment will be based on how students demonstrate their knowledge of the group studied in the
design of the embroidery and the relief sculpture frame. The artwork will be assessed on the use of
embroidery stitches and relief sculpture techniques - low relief, high relief, texture.
The assessment may include a self assessment checklist or a written reflection. The artist will plan
the form of the assessment with the teachers involved. The teachers will determine if the project is to
be graded.

Other Needs

This residency requires an on site kiln. Space is required for the storage of drying clay.
Materials include: clay, clay tools, glazes, muslin, embroidery floss.

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context: Students will demonstrate an understanding of
visual art as an essential aspect of history and human experience.
Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize
knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.

Non-Arts Standards

Social Studies Standard 2.0 Peoples of the Nation and World
Student will understand the diversity and commonality, human interdependence, and global
cooperation of the people of Maryland, the United States, and the World through a multicultural and a
historic perspective.

Residency 2: Habitat Relief Sculpture Mural

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: The fee for this residency is $60. an hour/session. Materials cost will vary according to the size o

Residency 2 Description

This residency will integrate science and art objectives in a relief sculpture mural depicting organisms
that live in a particular environment. Students will research a particular environment and the
organisms that live there. They will conduct their research using books, online resources, and if
appropriate, a field trip.
Students will work cooperatively to develop drawings of the environment and how the
organisms interact with the environment and each other. The drawings will be used to create one
large cartoon for the mural. The full size drawing will be marked off in a grid . This grid will be used to
divide the overall design into individual tiles.
Students will learn about relief sculpture techniques in clay. They will use these techniques in the
construction of the relief sculpture tiles that will comprise the mural. The completed murals will be
installed in the school.

Duration

The duration of the residency depends on the number of students involved and the size of the mural.For a grade level of 120 students sixty hours should be allotted. About 5-6 sessions per class shouldbe scheduled for assembling a mural where each student creates one tile. The remainder of the
hours would be allotted for the construction of the mural. Assembling each mural includes preparing
the substructure, laying out the tile, mortaring and grouting the tile; and sealing the entire mural.

Academic Focus:

Science/Technology

Assessment

The form of assessment will be discussed between the teachers and the artist at the outset of the
residency. It may take the form of a checklist that will help students self assess how they
demonstrated knowledge of the environment and it's constituent organisms. It would also provide a
checklist of relief sculpture techniques such as low and high relief, sunken relief and texture.

Other Needs

This residency requires an onsite kiln and space for clay to dry.
The materials required include: clay, glazes, clay tools, cement backerboard, thinset mortar, grout,
grout sealer, optional plywood backing and trim.

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 3.0 Creative Expression and Production: Students will demonstrate the ability to organize
knowledge and ideas for expression in the production of art.

Non-Arts Standards

Standard 3.0 Life Science
The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things,
their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time.

Residency 3: Embroidered History

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: The fee for the residency is $60. an hour/session. Materials are paid for by the school. Mileage wil

Residency 3 Description

This residency will integrate art and social studies objectives.
Using the Bayeaux tapestry as an exemplar, students will learn about the use of embroidery to relay
events.
This residency will focus on an historical period or event to be studied by students.
Students will learn several embroidery stitches. Students will then draw and embroider individual
scenes which will then be sewn together in panels to illustrate an historical event or important events
in a particular period of history. These panels can be installed as a permanent piece of artwork for
the school.

Duration

The duration of the residency will depend on the number of students participating. Approximately 6
sessions should be allotted per class for embroidery. Another 4 hours should be allowed per class to
assemble the panels. Depending on time constraints and student skill levels; the panels may be
stitched together by students or by the artist.
Again, times will vary according to the number of students involved and the finished size of the final
work.

Academic Focus:

Social Studies/History

Assessment

Assessment will be based on how accurately students have depicted the historical events/ period
under consideration. The embroidery will be assessed by the use predetermined criteria, such as the
use of three or more embroidery stitches.

Other Needs

Materials required are fabric, embroidery floss, fabric markers or fine point sharpies.

Fine Arts Standards

Standard 2.0 Historical, Cultural, and Social Context: Students will demonstrate an understanding of
visual art as an essential aspect of history and human experience.

Non-Arts Standards

Standard 5.0 History
Students will examine significant ideas, beliefs, and themes; organize patterns and events; and
analyze how individuals and societies have changed over time in Maryland and the United States.

Residency 4: Colonial Samlplers

Grade: 6th - 8th,3rd - 5th
Fee for Service: The fee for this residency is $60. hour/session. Materials are paid for by the school. Mileage will

Residency 4 Description

n this residency students will learn about the history of needlework in American colonial life. They
will design and create a sampler using historical techniques and materials. In colonial times and
after, the practice of creating a sampler was considered educational-both for acquiring the practical
skill of sewing, and for moral education. Young embroiderers were encouraged to stitch bits of poetry
or religious verse. In this residency students will update their traditional craft with sayings and images
that are important to their lives.

Duration

The duration of this residency is flexible, six to ten sessions per class depending on the size of the
finished sampler.

Academic Focus:

Social Studies/History

Assessment

Assessment: a variety of assessments will be used: a checklist of criteria, brief written response,
verbal questions, gallery walk.

Other Needs

Materials needed for this residency are fabric, embroidery floss, fabric marker or sharpies, and
colored pencils.

Fine Arts Standards

Fine Arts Standard 2.0 Historical, cultural and social context: Students will demonstrate an
understanding of visual arts as an essential aspect of history and human experience.

Non-Arts Standards

Social Studies Standard-5.0 History- Students will examine significant ideas, beliefs, and themes;
organize patterns and events; and analyze how individuals and societies changed over time in
Maryland and the United States.

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